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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 175-180

Identification of adulterants of Terminalia arjuna bark from market samples through a pharmacognostical study


1 Department of Dravyaguna, Sri Jayendra Saraswati Ayurvedic College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Rasashastra and Bhaishajya Kalpana, Sri Jayendra Saraswati Ayurvedic College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Polepalli Mallikarjuna Rao
Department of Dravyaguna, Sri Jayendra Saraswati Ayurvedic College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JISM.JISM_24_21

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Background: Pharmacognostical parameters, namely macroscopic and microscopic techniques, are very important in the identification of drugs. The macroscopic and microscopic feature of medicinal plants is believable, accurate and involves less cost. So, the study of the morphology and the organoleptic nature of drugs is undertaken using highly sophisticated modern techniques. In Ayurveda, Arjuna bark is an important drug for the treatment of heart disorders and other diseases. There is a great demand for Arjuna bark in the market, and it is very prone to getting adulterated. To find out the correct identity of Arjuna bark from adulterants with the help of pharmacognostical techniques, the present study was undertaken. Materials and Methods: The Arjuna bark was obtained from the source tree and from four raw drug markets of the capital cities of south India. These five Arjuna bark samples were considered for analyzing their organoleptic characteristics; microscopic examination, polarization, fluorescence microscopic examination, powder microscopy, and thin layer chromatography (TLC) of the drug were used for authentication. Results: The Arjuna bark collected from the source tree and the market samples showed the same presentations, thus the market samples were acceptable. It is also found that the bark of the tree Terminalia paniculata is used as an adulterant in a negligible quantity. Conclusion: The present study reveals that, the chances of adulteration for T. arjuna are very less.


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